Making Your LinkedIn Posts More Personal

Introduction

How do you share your personal feelings on LinkedIn, without being accused of sharing ‘too much’?

Many of my clients want to promote a softer, more engaging side of their business, without resorting to sharing videos of dancing kittens. The truth is, it’s a fine line. Every week I see LinkedIn posts which attract a storm of protest from fellow users crying “this isn’t Facebook”.

The trick is to post your professional updates and views in a personal way to generate engagement which will then attract a larger audience.

To do this, you need to understand how LinkedIn works, so here is a brief overview based on personal experience and industry folklore. All posts are scanned for spam before LinkedIn deems them suitable for sharing with your network (1st connections). The speed at which people like, share and comment on your post will then determine how quickly your audience grows. The first few hours will determine the success of your post.

Imagine a steam train using engagement as the fuel to make the wheels turn faster. If nobody is sharing or liking your post, the furnace cools and the wheels stop.

In order to create some steam, don’t be afraid to upset a few people. The right subject matter can attract a large audience, prompting some followers to have a heated argument in the comments section. Start the debate and then step back while the flames take hold.

Being too professional or simply promoting your business is a sure way to turn followers away. Never forget that people buy from people, so we naturally seek common interests or opinions. You will gain more trust if you share something about yourself.

For example, posting views on issues close to your heart (fundraising, health, travel, sport etc) will encourage others to respond with their own experiences. Finding the right mix between professional and personal will mean more people will see your posts, hopefully generating more business for you.

Finally, remember to avoid sharing your personal opinions on religion and politics – especially Brexit.

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